[re.form] vintage Japanese textiles — #textiles RSS



Meisen fabric and the kimono made from it  was in a way the fast fashion of its time. It was produced more quickly, simply and with less cost than traditional artisan methods and was worn by young women eager to follow fashion.   Meinsen evolved from the robust, moderately priced silk produced in Isesaki and surrounding towns in Gunma Prefecture, Japan. The development of mechanized spinning and weaving in the late 19th century meant that it became possible to produce a finer, more lustrous, but still hard-wearing fabric which was then patterned using a simplified kasuri method. Dyes mixed with rice paste were applied by stencils on to warp (vertical) threads woven with temporary weft (horizontal) threads. These temporary wefts were...

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Kasuri is a thread-resist textile in which the warp and/or weft threads are tied or compressed before dyeing so that when woven they form a pre-determined pattern Kasuri is a often thought of as a cotton or hemp (asa) cloth that was especially popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and which is now associated with traditional rural Japan – particularly those which have white repeat patterns on indigo dyed woven cloth. The word kasuri is probably derived from the name for thread-resist fabrics from the southern Ryukyuan island of Yeyama - kashiri- it also sounds like the words kasuru which means to blur and kasumi which refers to mist or haze. As kasuri patterns often have a...

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