[re.form] vintage Japanese textiles RSS



lilac time

Is it just me, but since designer Simon Porte-Jacquemus showed his Spring/Summer 2020 collection in the lavender fields of Provence last summer, purple – from deep to light tones – has been featuring in fashion more and more?

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Markets in 2019

Since the closure of the spaces in Newmarket Square things have been very quiet on the market front in Dublin...

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Furoshiki

Furoshiki are square pieces of fabric designed to be used with a traditional Japanese cloth-folding technique for wrapping gifts, clothes or other goods. It is thougth that furoshiki  originated around 710-794 AD as a way for visitors to traditional onsen baths to keep their clothes safe while they bathed, and subsequently was adopted by merchants as a way to cover and protect goods. Here are a few examples of how to fold a furoshiki: Furoshiki wrapping techniques courtesy of Ministry of Environment, Government of Japan For more ideas on how to use your furoshiki go here There are plenty of Youtube videos that show you how to wrap with furoshiki, but this one with basic knots and this one from...

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Visit [re.form] at the Dublin Flea Christmas Market!

Visit us this winter at the Dublin Flea Christmas Market December 6th-9th Point Square Dublin 1. [re.form] are pleased to announce that we will be at the first of the two Dublin Flea Christmas Markets this year bringing lots of lovely vintage Japanese silks and textiles that make delightful and unique gifts - kimonos, haori jackets, vintage evening bags and accessories!! Although [re.form] will only be at the first weekend, there will be two indoor markets on consecutive weekends from Thursday to Sunday, each hosting a different selection 140 stalls featuring exciting Irish-based creative start-ups & small businesses from artists, designers and craft makers to retro vintage and antique collectors and artisan food producers. Dublin Flea Christmas Market, indoors at...

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Kasuri is a thread-resist textile in which the warp and/or weft threads are tied or compressed before dyeing so that when woven they form a pre-determined pattern Kasuri is a often thought of as a cotton or hemp (asa) cloth that was especially popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and which is now associated with traditional rural Japan – particularly those which have white repeat patterns on indigo dyed woven cloth. The word kasuri is probably derived from the name for thread-resist fabrics from the southern Ryukyuan island of Yeyama - kashiri- it also sounds like the words kasuru which means to blur and kasumi which refers to mist or haze. As kasuri patterns often have a...

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